Seychelles

We are a little behind in our updates but will try to catch up as we can. We are currently in Sydney, Australia and will have updates on that once we have caught up with the rest. We will pick up where we left off back in mid-August……

After leaving Tanzania we made our way to the Seychelles islands via Nairobi. I think I mentioned in one of our last blogs that the Nairobi airport burned down around 36 hours after we flew through there on our way to Tanzania. We were worried about potential delays or even cancellations but everything worked out fine. They replaced the normal terminals with tents. They had metal detectors, food stands and even duty free shops on the tarmac.

This is a before shot of the terminal. It may have needed an upgrade.

Here is the after….

Anyway, the Seychelles are a group of 150 islands in the Indian Ocean north east of Madagascar. There are 3 main islands that have approximately 90% of the population. The most populous, Mahe, is located 4 degrees south of the equator.

Mahe is represented by the red pin in the middle of the Indian Ocean.

The islands are known for azure waters, beautiful white sand beaches, and the world's largest seed, the coco de mer. They are also strict on yellow fever vaccinations which our travel physician (based on WHO guidelines) did not think we needed. Unfortunately the health department of the Seychelles disagreed and I was forced to waste a few hours to find the Victoria hospital for a nurse to ask if I had symptoms of yellow fever. It ended up being a complete waste of time! I don't know if the moral of that story is to get the vaccination or to just skip the “mandatory” symptom check if you don't get it.

This is the hospital

On our 2nd day we took a trip to two of the neighboring islands, praslin (pronounced like it doesn't have an s), and la digue.

On la digue we were greeted with a nice coconut drink.

We then went to one of the “most beautiful beaches in the world,” Anse Source D'argent. This is apparently a popular beach for filming commercials such as those for Bacardi rum.

The beach was very nice with small stretches of sand surrounded by granite boulders

We then made our way to praslin. This is home of the Valee de Mai and the coco de mer. This is the only island were the coco de mer is native. The seeds are huge!

We then went to one of the other “most beautiful beaches in the world,” Anse Lazio. Also pretty nice…

The next day we drove a bit around the island and ended up at the largest beach on the island, Beau Vallon. It was a bit busier but fun. We did some swimming and had a nice wood fired pizza on the beach.

We finally decided to get some exercise on the 22nd day of the trip. We hiked Morne Blanc to get a nice view of the Indian Ocean and the west side of the island.
 
 

A little rickety but it worked..

Nice views.

Just to add a little more exercise we hiked 1 hour to a slightly less accessible beach, Anse Major.

We had made arrangements to do a snorkeling trip on our last day but the guy that was supposed to take us didn't show up. We finally tracked him down in the bar (at 10 am) and he offered to take us out in what was basically a row boat. We declined and tried to scramble onto another boat. We were unable to find anything so…. More beaches!

Port Launay. It rained while we were there for around an hour or so. It was almost the only rain we saw for the 1st 40 days of the trip.

We hit a couple of others but they start to look the same so we will spare you the pictures….

One thing we did notice was that things in the Seychelles were expensive. Food was a mixture of Indian and creole. There were lots of curries including octopus and prawn and they were usually good. The local beer was called Sey Brew which was OK if you like to pay 12 bucks for a 6 pack of bud-lite. Overall it was fun and relaxing!

Later that night we left and made our way to Bali via Abu Dhabi and Kuala Lumpur. We will have more on that soon.

 

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